Are you drinking enough water?

June 3, 2018

 

When it reaches 3pm, and you’re craving your afternoon ‘pick-me-up’ treat or coffee… think again. There’s another way to get your energy boost. 
 
It’s a glass of cold water.
 
Water is your body’s main source of energy – and it does a lot more than that!
 
Many of the physical problems we experience often come from a lack of hydration. If you feel thirsty, you’re already on your way to dehydration – you will have already lost around 2-3% of your body’s water content.
 
That has a big impact on how your body functions… your mental and physical coordination start to become impaired once your body’s dehydration drops just 1%. Dehydration can lead to:

  • poor metabolism;

  • increased hunger and fatigue;

  • higher levels of acids and inflammation; and

  • fuzzy memory and thinking.

Every cell, organ, muscle and bone in your body thrives on good, clean water. Water flushes impurities, reduces acids and improves skin quality. It converts prevents constipation, makes the body’s repair mechanisms more efficient... and much more!

But not all water is ‘good’ for you.
 
Tap water is perhaps the worst type of water as it’s packed full of chemicals, heavy metals and wastes, as well as being highly chlorinated and fluoridated. Rainwater often has to pass through thick bands of pollution, which affects the quality. Stream water is also exposed to rain water run-off or other residues, increasing toxicity levels.
 
The best water you can put into your body is filtered, alkalized water. I’d recommend investing in an alkalized water filter, but if you can’t afford one, there are other less expensive options. You could use a ceramic filter, buy bottled water, or even boil your water. 
 
Plus, you can also naturally alkalize your water by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime. As an added benefit, adding some lemon in the morning will do wonders to your digestive system!
 
--
*Sources:
- Beni Johnson, Healthy & Free, 2015, pg 51-56
- Katrina Ellis, Shattering the Cancer Myth, 2013, 4th edition, pg 253-254

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